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Monday, October 23 2017

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    The findings of the study showed a statistically significant positive impact across the board on student academic confidence, sense of belonging, and mastery of skills employers value in the courses using transparently designed assignments.  The impact on underserved student success of the transparently designed assignments was particularly significant. 
     
    The findings of the study showed a statistically significant positive impact across the board on student academic confidence, sense of belonging, and mastery of skills employers value in the courses using transparently designed assignments.  The impact on underserved student success of the transparently designed assignments was particularly significant. 
     
    Mary-Ann Winkelmes, Ph.D. is the Coordinator of Instructional Development and Research at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.  Dr. Winkelmes is also a Senior Fellow with the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U), and the Founder and Principal Investigator of the Transparency in Learning and Teaching in Higher Education Project (TILT Higher Ed).
     
    Mary-Ann Winkelmes, Ph.D. is the Coordinator of Instructional Development and Research at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.  Dr. Winkelmes is also a Senior Fellow with the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U), and the Founder and Principal Investigator of the Transparency in Learning and Teaching in Higher Education Project (TILT Higher Ed).
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    For additional resources and examples on Transparency in Learning and Teaching from TILT Higher Ed, please use the link here. [1]
     
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    [1] https://www.unlv.edu/provost/transparency/tilt-higher-ed-examples-and-resources
     
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Friday, June 16 2017

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    In this 2010 report researchers at the Center for Community College Student Engagement, of the University of Texas at Austin's College of Education, present national level survey data on student success and completion rates at US community colleges. 

    The report discusses the challenges facing community college students' ability to graduate -- including the need for remedial education; the lack of academic confidence of community college students; the prepreponderance of community college students that need to work full-time or part-time or that have family committments; and community college instructors who are knowledgeable about their disciplines but unprepared to teach the increasingly diverse community college student population of today. 

    Additionally, the report makes clear that increasing completion rates, while essential, is not enough unless "degree completion is a proxy for real learning."  

Thursday, June 15 2017

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    This video, presented by Michael Willard of California State University Los Angeles, discusses the findings of the AAC&U Transparency and Problem Centered Learning study.  The study was funded by TG Philanthropy and was conducted at seven minority serving institutions in the 2014-2015 academic year.  The study addressed the research question:

    What is the effect when teachers provide two transparently designed, problem-centered take-home assignments (compared to the un-revised, business as usual take-home assignments in the comparison group) on spring-term first year college student’s learning experiences, especially underserved students’ experiences?

    In this video Michael Willard defines problem solving, explains the importance of problem-solving assignments for enhancing student learning, and presents strategies for creating effective problem solving assignments.    Additionally, Dr. Willard explains how the AAC&U Value Rubric played a key role in the design of transparent, problem center assignments throughout the study, and explains the value of problem solving assignments in increasing the employability of college students. 

    Michael Willard holds a Ph.D. in American Studies from the University of Minnesota. His teaching, research, and publications focus on popular/youth culture and racial formation in Los Angeles of the past and present. He co-edited Generations of Youth: Youth Cultures and History and Sports Matters: Race, Recreation, and Culture. His articles have appeared in American Quarterly and edited collections on popular culture and American cultural history.

Wednesday, May 31 2017

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    4:32pm

    This April 2017 report produced by the Community College Research Center, part of Columbia University's Teachers College, "provides insight into how colleges are planning and implemplenting 'guided pathways' reforms based on the early work of 30 colleges participating in the American Association of Community Colleges' (AACC) Pathways Project."

    The report, drawing on telelphone interviews with project teams as well as project site visits, describes four main areas in which colleges are approaching guided pathways reforms:

    1) mapping pathways to student end goals

    2) helping student choose and enter a program pathway

    3) keeping students on a path

    4) ensuring students are learning

    The report emphasizes reforms that are novel and innovative. 

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    3:49pm

    In this article from the Winter 2017 Peer Review issue, available here, Howard Tinberg of Bristol Community College outlines the case for the importance of English 101 in preparing community college students to be successful writers and to learn how to think theoretically about their writing.  In particular, Tinberg encourages community college English 101 professors to embrace a "Teaching for Transfer" approach.  As Tinberg argues: "Teaching for Transfer (TFT) adopts a writing curriculum that boldly charges students to develop a portable theory of writing applicable accross broad and varied contexts, including the workplace."  Tinberg provides a number of specific examples of sample assignments, in-class activities, and discussions that that authors employs in the classroom in designing a TFT curriculum. 

Wednesday, May 24 2017

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    2:10pm

    A publication that explains the importance of general education courses at St. Olaf College - intended for incoming St. Olaf Freshmen. The publication outlines St. Olaf College's general education course requirements and uses quotes from seniors and alumni to explain the importance of particular types of General Education courses (e.g. foreign language study) for the professional and personal development of students. 

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    1:40pm

    In late 2007, Jobs for the Future, working with the Delta Project on Postsecondary Costs, Productivity and Accountability, launched Investing in Student Success, a one-year pilot program.  The pilot, conceived of as part of the Making Opportunity Affordable initiative and funded by Walmart Foundation and Lumina Foundation for education, focused on exploring whether first-year programs designed to retain students are a cost-effective investment for colleges and universities.

    JFF and the Delta Project recruited 13 colleges and universties to participate in Investing in Student Success.  This pilot project tied program-level cost data to student outcomes and explored the extent to which the additional revenue that colleges and universities generate by increasing student retention offsets the additional cost of first-year programs.  The project's goal was to develop, test, and standardize tools that document the relationship between program costs and student results.

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    11:59am
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    At Portland State University all students in University Studies Freshman inquiries classes are required to develop a learning portfolio and to write a reflective essay at the end of the year.  To facilitate this process, University Studies provides comprehensive support to students for developing an electronic portfolio, an eportfolio. 
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    At Portland State University all students in University Studies Freshman Inquiries classes are required to develop a learning portfolio and to write a reflective essay at the end of the year.  To facilitate this process, University Studies provides comprehensive support to students for developing an electronic portfolio, an eportfolio. 
     
    According to PSU, "An eportfolio is not merely a repository to store one's asssignment's an eportfolio is a tool which enables students to align each of the four Universities Studies Goals with a formal learning experience.  So, an eportfolio is a place to record one's thoughts on piece of work, to think critically about an integrated learning experience, to write reflective statements about successes and challenges with FRINQ course assignments, and to share work with others for additional feedback and recognition."
     
    According to PSU, "An eportfolio is not merely a repository to store one's asssignment's an eportfolio is a tool which enables students to align each of the four Universities Studies Goals with a formal learning experience.  So, an eportfolio is a place to record one's thoughts on piece of work, to think critically about an integrated learning experience, to write reflective statements about successes and challenges with FRINQ course assignments, and to share work with others for additional feedback and recognition."
     
    This is a link to a sample PSU student ePortfolio. [1]  PSU also has an extensive discussion of how ePortfolios work at PSU, and the the thinking behind making ePortfolio's mandatory [2] for students in FRINQ (Freshman Inquiries) classes. 
     
    This is a link to a sample PSU student ePortfolio. [...
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    11:58am

    At Portland State University all students in University Studies Freshman Inquiries classes are required to develop a learning portfolio and to write a reflective essay at the end of the year.  To facilitate this process, University Studies provides comprehensive support to students for developing an electronic portfolio, an eportfolio. 

    According to PSU, "An eportfolio is not merely a repository to store one's asssignment's an eportfolio is a tool which enables students to align each of the four Universities Studies Goals with a formal learning experience.  So, an eportfolio is a place to record one's thoughts on piece of work, to think critically about an integrated learning experience, to write reflective statements about successes and challenges with FRINQ course assignments, and to share work with others for additional feedback and recognition."

    This is a link to a sample PSU student ePortfolio.  PSU also has an extensive discussion of how ePortfolios work at PSU, and the the thinking behind making ePortfolio's mandatory for students in FRINQ (Freshman Inquiries) classes. 

Friday, May 19 2017

Monday, May 15 2017

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    In a two-year cycle, faculty design and administer assessments for two outcomes, and collect and analyze the results in year one. In the second year, faculty use those results to improve their instruction and curriculum while designing and administering assessments for the next three outcomes. Faculty norm and assess randomly-selected, anonymous pieces of students' work using rubrics modified from AAC&U's VALUE Rubrics.
     
    In a two-year cycle, faculty design and administer assessments for two outcomes, and collect and analyze the results in year one. In the second year, faculty use those results to improve their instruction and curriculum while designing and administering assessments for the next three outcomes. Faculty norm and assess randomly-selected, anonymous pieces of students' work using rubrics modified from AAC&U's VALUE Rubrics.
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    The following video offers a preview of the General Education Student Learning Outcomes (GESLO) Assessment at Spokane Falls Community College. SFCC's General Education Outcomes are derived from the Association of American Colleges & Universities' LEAP Essential Learning Outcomes:

    • Communication
    • Creative Thinking
    • Critical Thinking
    • Diverse Perspectives
    • Information Literacy
    • Quantitative Literacy

    In a two-year cycle, faculty design and administer assessments for two outcomes, and collect and analyze the results in year one. In the second year, faculty use those results to improve their instruction and curriculum while designing and administering assessments for the next three outcomes. Faculty norm and assess randomly-selected, anonymous pieces of students' work using rubrics modified from AAC&U's VALUE Rubrics.

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    In the following video, Ira Gardner and Dr. Sarah Martin of the assessment team at Spokane Valley Community College, offer a model Gen Ed Assessment Cycle and some tips for designing a signature assignment. Also offered are models for signature assignment design work groups and an example exit survey. 
     
    In the following video, Ira Gardner and Dr. Sarah Martin of the assessment team at Spokane Valley Community College, offer a model Gen Ed Assessment Cycle and some tips for designing a signature assignment. Also offered are models for signature assignment design work groups and an example exit survey. 
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  • 4:09pm

    In the following video, Ira Gardner and Dr. Sarah Martin of the assessment team at Spokane Valley Community College, offer a model Gen Ed Assessment Cycle and some tips for designing a signature assignment. Also offered are models for signature assignment design work groups and an example exit survey. 

Wednesday, May 10 2017

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    *This issue of Peer Review * [1]funded by TG Philanthropy, explores the relationship between high-impact practices and underserved student success. The articles address what faculty can do to redesign courses to achieve transparency in student learning and embed effective practices, such as a problem-centered curriculum, to foster underserved student development and success in college.
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    *This issue of Peer Review* [1]*,** * [2]funded by TG Philanthropy, explores the relationship between high-impact practices and underserved student success. The articles address what faculty can do to redesign courses to achieve transparency in student learning and embed effective practices, such as a problem-centered curriculum, to foster underserved student development and success in college.
     
     
     
    [1] http://www.aacu.org/peerreview/2016/winter-spring
     
    [1] http://www.aacu.org/peerreview/2016/winter-spring
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    [2] http://www.aacu.org/peerreview/2016/winter-spring
     
     
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